All families are equal and none should be forced to live apart.

But we have a system that makes refugee families wait for years on end to reunite. 

Some people are separated for years. Some never see their children, mothers or brothers ever again. 

Join us and call on our Government to cut the red tape and keep #FamiliesTogether 

Keep families together

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ACT NOW

Lucy's story

Originally from South Sudan, Lucy has lived in Australia since 1991. She was separated from her three-year-old daughter Susan in 1988 due to civil war in Sudan. They were eventually reunited in Australia in 1994.

Read more here

Read our research report 'Stronger Together'.

READ REPORT

‘Stronger Together’ incorporates research from Monash University and Deloitte access economics to explain why everyone benefits when we keep families together

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Oxfam works with people all over the work providing clean water and access to work so they can support their family. Donate now to support families and save lives.

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Families are the glue the binds communities together. Sign up here to campaign in your community to keep families together.

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Dabessa and his wife Lelisse are members of the Oromo ethnic community in Ethiopia. The couple worked as journalists for a government-owned television station in Ethiopia until Dabessa was jailed in 2004 on suspicions that he supported the dissenting Oromo Liberation Front. After nine long years of persecution, separation and uncertainty, their family was reunited in Australia in 2013.

Read more here.

Dabessa's story

Oxfam has a long history of working with displaced families in refugee camps and host communities. We understand that families need to stick together and support each other. 

Families are stronger together and none should have to live apart. 

But many people who have sought refuge in Australia and followed all the rules remain separated from their families for years on end due to unfair, unreasonable restrictions and red tape.

People can wait up to 30 years to reunite with their loved ones, and pay up to $47,000 in visa costs. 

For those who have come to Australia to find sanctuary, this separation limits their ability to gain an education, develop new social networks, or find and hold employment. 

The system is broken — it takes too long, it’s too expensive and it's too complicated.

Join us in calling for the Government to cut the red tape and keep #FamiliesTogether

What's keeping families apart?

All families are equal, and none should be forced to live apart.

But we have a system that makes refugee families wait for years on end to reunite. 

Sometimes they are separated for years. Sometimes they never see their children, mothers, or brothers ever again. 

Join us, and call on our government to cut the red tape and keep #FamiliesTogether. 

Keep families together

Lucy's story

Originally from South Sudan, Lucy has lived in Australia since 1991. She was separated from her three-year-old daughter Susan in 1988 due to civil war in Sudan. They were eventually reunited in Australia in 1994.

Read more here

Dabessa and his wife Lelisse are members of the Oromo ethnic community in Ethiopia. The couple worked as journalists for a government-owned television station in Ethiopia until Dabessa was jailed in 2004 on suspicions that he supported the dissenting Oromo Liberation Front. After nine long years of persecution, separation and uncertainty, their family was reunited in Australia in 2013.

Read more here.

Dabessa's Story

Oxfam has a long history of working with displaced families in refugee camps and host communities. We understand that families need to stick together and support each other. 

Families are stronger together and none should have to live apart. 

But many people who have sought refuge in Australia and followed all the rules remain separated from their families for years on end due to unfair, unreasonable restrictions and red tape.

People can wait up to 30 years to reunite with their loved ones, and pay up to $47,000 in visa costs. 

For those who have come to Australia to find sanctuary, this separation limits their ability to gain an education, develop new social networks, or find and hold employment. 

The system is broken — it takes too long, it’s too expensive and it's too complicated.

Join us in calling for the Government to cut the red tape and keep #FamiliesTogether

Barriers to Family Reunion

SIGN THE PETITIONSIGN THE PETITION

"When I arrived in Australia, 
I didn’t know where she was."

— Lucy, Adelaide

“A united family is productive — united family is stronger than the separated one.”

— Dabessa, Melbourne

"When I arrived in Australia, I didn’t know where she was."

— Lucy, Adelaide

“A united family is productive — united family is stronger than the separated one.”

— Dabessa, Melbourne